Saturday, May 26, 2018

Butterfly Dream: Parade Haiku by Gail Oare

English Original

memorial day
the parade lengthens
by a new war

Prune Juice, July 2017

Gail Oare


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

國家紀念日
因為新的戰爭爆發
遊行隊伍加長

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

国家纪念日
因为新的战争爆发
游行队伍加长


Bio Sketch

Gail Oare, a retired science publishing executive, writes poetry, short fiction and nonfiction.  She lives near Pittsburgh.

Friday, May 25, 2018

To the Lighthouse: Word Choice, the Center of the Practice of Writing

                                                                                                         morning shower --
                                                                                                         finding just the word
                                                                                                         I was looking for

                                                                                                         Carolyn Hall
One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple.
-- Jack Kerouac


In "Word Choice in English-Language Haiku: The Uses of Roots" (Frogpond, 36:1, 2013, pp. 72-76), David Grayson emphasizes that

Word choice stands at the center of the practice of writing. This is particularly true for poetry, and even more so for haiku. Simply put, the choice of a word can make or break a poem... (p. 72)

I agree with David Grayson completely: the choice of a word can make or break a [haiku.] Like Cid Corman, I believe that 

... words have color, form, character; they have faces, ports, manners, gesticulations; they are mood, humors, eccentricities; -- they have tints, tones, personalities ... (Cid Corman, At Their Word, p. 156).

There is little room for lengthy description in writing haiku; therefore, haiku relies on strict simplicity of phrasing and careful word choice. Writing haiku is a good exercise in concise, purposeful word choice. Haiku practitioners can hone their haiku by "improving word choice, re-drafting for maximum precision and concreteness, choosing details and imagery that 'show'  the particular mood, sensations and/or ideas they perceive in their subject image." (Caroline Smith,"Reading and Writing Haiku Based on Traditional Japanese Criteria")

Take the following haiku for example:

the front porch
filled with childhood laughter
moving day

When I workshopped this haiku in a poetry forum, several poets suggested that it might be better to change "childhood laughter" to "children's laughter" or leave out "childhood."

Case 1: changing "childhood laughter" to "children's laughter"

Evaluated in the thematic and emotional context of my haiku, there is a BIG difference between childhood laughter and children's laughter. childhood laughter is used to describe a memory of how the porch used to be used many years ago. Its succeeding line, moving day, is in the present, when the narrator's has left childhood behind. A sense of sadness is subtly conveyed through the poignant juxtaposition of "childhood laughter" (in the past) and "moving day" (in the present).

If I had children's laughter instead, I would read this new phrase, "filled with children's laughter," as in the present tense, and interpret the scene described in revised haiku completely different from the one portrayed in my original: as a family is moving out (or in), the children have time to play and laugh on the porch while the parents/adults attend to  the more serious matter of doing or supervising the moving.

Case 2: leaving out "childhood"

I would read this revised line, "filled with laughter" as in the present, and  interpret the revised haiku as a family happily moving in to their new home or moving out of their old house.

One word can make such a BIG difference to a haiku.

And each word is a matter of life and death -- Cid Corman


Note: You can the full text of David Grayso's article here. The haiku below are fine examples used in his article.

first frost
the echo in the caw
of the crow

Mark Hollingsworth’s poem (which won Frogpond’s best of the Fall 2009 issue) contains the Old English-derived words “first”, “frost” and “crow”. These words produce an austere and spare feeling that underscores the scene....

the sack of kittens
sinking in the icy creek,
increases the cold

In this classic by Nick Virgilio, the Old English words- “sack”, “sink”, “creek” and “cold” – paint a sharp picture that is multi-sensory. The reader can feel the cold and the wet, and imagine the muffled cries of the kittens...

... Sometimes a word can surprise you, as in Gary Snyder’s poem:

 pissing

 watching

   a

waterfall

Without resorting to the dictionary, we might reasonably expect that “piss” (vs “urinate”) would be of older lineage in English. It denotes a basic bodily function, is one syllable, and is of common (even vulgar) usage. But it’s of Latin (French) origin. So, there are exceptions....

Butterfly Dream: Night of Stars Haiku by an’ya

English Original

night of stars
all along the precipice
goat bells ring

The Heron's Nest, 3, February, 2001

an’ya


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

星星之夜
沿著懸崖山羊的鈴聲
不斷地響

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

星星之夜
沿着悬崖山羊的铃声
不断地响


Bio Sketch

an'ya is a haiku and tanka poet who has been published in over 60 foreign languages, and appeared in places and publications worldwide. If you would like to read more of her works and a complete biography, please visit http://tankaanya.com/

Thursday, May 24, 2018

One Man's Maple Moon: Chance Meeting Tanka by Sheila Bello

English Original

chance meeting
he hugs and hugs me
as if it matters
he knew where to find me
all these years

Moonbathing, 7, Autumn/Winter 2012-13

Sheila Bello


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

不期而遇
他一再地擁抱我
好像這是很重要
這些年來他知道
在哪裡可以找到我

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

不期而遇
他一再地拥抱我
好像这是很重要
这些年来他知道
在哪里可以找到我


Bio Sketch

Sheila Bello writes haiku, tanka, lyric poetry, creative nonfiction and short fiction. She lives in Scarborough, Ontario. Sheila was born in Trinidad and migrated to Canada in 1972. She is inspired by nature and is an avid gardener.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Butterfly Dream: Ceasefire News Haiku by Justice Joseph Prah

English Original

ceasefire news ...
Mother mutters as she draws
her last breath

Justice Joseph Prah


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

停火新聞 ...
當吞下最後一口氣時
母親口中喃喃不止

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

停火新闻...
当吞下最后一口气时
母亲口中喃喃不止


Bio Sketch

Justice Joseph Prah is a Ghanaian and a member of Africa Haiku Network and United Haiku Tanka Society. His haiku have appeared several times in Africa Haiku Mamba e-anthology, Mainichi Daily Haiku column, Haiku Masters webpage, Asahi Haikuist Network, Robert Epstein Haiku anthology on Animals Right, The Moon Takes Off Haiku and Senryu anthology, Brass Bell, Cattails, and Shambhala Times Community Magazines etc.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

Butterfly Dream: Nursing Home Haiku by Natalia Kuznetsova

English Original

leaves whisper ...
outside the nursing home
nothing else

Natalia Kuznetsova


Chinese Translation (Traditional)


樹葉沙沙作響 ...
療養院外面
沒有其他的動靜

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

树叶沙沙作响 ...
疗养院外面
没有其他的动静


Bio Sketch

Living in Moscow, Russia, Natalia Kuznetsova is an assistant professor of English and freelance interpreter. Before discovering the haiku world, she wrote poetry in Russian. She started writing tanka and mostly haiku in English several years ago, and participated in numerous competitions worldwide and won some awards. She now contributes regularly to World Haiku Review, Mainichi Daily, Asahi Haikuist Network, Shiki Kukai and other traditional and on-line publications. She was included on the list of "European Top 100 Most Creative Haiku Authors" from 2010 to 2013.

One Man's Maple Moon: Roses Tanka by Robert Henry Poulin

English Original

caught
being unfaithful
for the first time
I send her the roses,
every thorn removed

Robert Henry Poulin


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

第一次
我被逮到
不忠實
我送她一束玫瑰花,
並且拔除每一根刺

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

第一次
我被逮到
不忠实
我送她一束玫瑰花,
并且拔除每一根刺


Bio Sketch

Robert Henry Poulin is published internationally, winning awards for his poetry. He is CEO of Colt Media Group, and he has several books in print on haiku. He is a widower living in Florida.

Monday, May 21, 2018

Butterfly Dream: Now and Then Haiku by Fay Aoyagi

English Original

winter sunset
the Pacific Ocean between
my ‘now’ and ‘then’

Blue Willow Haiku World,  January 30, 2011

Fay Aoyagi


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

冬天日落微光
太平洋隔離
我的現今和當時

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

冬天日落微光
太平洋隔离
我的现今和当时


Bio Sketch

Fay Aoyagi (青柳飛)was born in Tokyo and immigrated to the U.S. in 1982. She is currently a member of Haiku Society of America and Haiku Poets of Northern California. She serves as an associate editor of The Heron's Nest.  She also writes in Japanese and belongs to two Japanese haiku groups; Ten'I (天為) and "Aki"(秋), and  she is a member of Haijin Kyokai (俳人協会).

Saturday, May 19, 2018

One Man's Maple Moon: Fukushima Tanka by Alegria Imperial

English Original

after Fukushima --
another note from Mie
tells me
her bonsai cherry tree
blossomed a little

Atlas Poetica Special Features: The Atomic Era, 2015

Alegria Imperial


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

福島核災之後
另一份來自米兒的便條
告訴我
她的櫻桃樹盆栽
開了一些花

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

福岛核灾之后
另一份来自米儿的便条
告诉我
她的樱桃树盆栽
开了一些花


Bio Sketch

With works published in international journals, Alegria Imperial, a former media person and journalist in Manila, Philippines, since stumbling on Japanese short form poetry ten years ago, has found the perfect fit for her writing. She now lives in Vancouver, Canada.

Butterfly Dream: First Laugh Haiku by Lee Nash

English Original

first laugh
I can hear my daughter
dreaming

Asahi Haikuist Network, May 5, 2017

Lee Nash


Chinese Translation (Traditional)
   
首次的微笑
我可以聽到我的女兒
在做夢

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

首次的微笑
我可以听到我的女儿
在做梦


Bio Sketch

Lee Nash lives in France and freelances as an editor and proofreader. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in print and online journals including Acorn, Ambit, Angle, Mezzo Cammin, Orbis, Poetry Salzburg Review, Presence, and The World Haiku Review. You can find out more from her website.

Friday, May 18, 2018

One Man's Maple Moon: Homecoming Tanka by Marion Alice Poirier

English Original

first homecoming,
a pitcher of blossoms
brightens my room --
only the cherry trees
the same as I remember

Marion Alice Poirier


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

首次返鄉,
一瓶盛開的鮮花
使我的房間生輝 --
在我的記憶中
只有櫻花樹保持不變

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

首次返鄉,
一瓶盛開的鮮花
使我的房间生辉 --
在我的记忆中
只有樱花树保持不变


Bio Sketch

Marion Alice Poirier is a lifetime resident of  Boston, MA.  She began writing haiku in 2001 and eventually began to teach haiku in workshops on Poetry Circle and Emerging Poets. She also write short poetry and have been published in on-line haiku and short poetry journals like Tinywords, Hedgerow and The Heron's Nest.

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Butterfly Dream: Hillside Path Haiku by Lysa Collins

English Original

hillside path --
catching the scent of hyacinths
I retrace my steps

Lysa Collins


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

山坡路 --
為了享受風信子的香味
我走回原路

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

山坡路 --
为了享受风信子的香味
我走回原路


Bio Sketch

Lysa Collins is an environmentalist who currently lives on the west coast of British Columbia, overlooking the Strait of Georgia, where she writes haiku and other short forms of poetry.  Her poems appear locally, nationally, and internationally, in a variety of print and online publications.

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

One Man's Maple Moon: Gatepost Tanka by Anne Curran

English Original

a heron
resting on the gatepost
in river fog ...
I listen for the call
of my ancestors

Cattails, June 2015

Anne Curran


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

在河霧中
一隻蒼鷺
在門柱上休息 ...
我正在傾聽
來自祖先們的呼喚

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

在河雾中
一只苍鹭
在门柱上休息...
我正在倾听
来自祖先们的呼唤


Bio Sketch

Anne Curran is  Japanese verse form poet who lives in Hamilton, New Zealand. She is very grateful to all poets and editors who have been encouraging in this writing journey. She lives with an extended family who she loves dearly. She loves to read poetry, literature and news of all kinds.

Butterfly Dream: Flute Notes Haiku by Jane Reichhold

English Original

sun down
sliding between redwoods
flute notes

DailyHaiku, Cycle 12, 2011

Jane Reichhold


Chinese Translation (Traditional)

太陽下山了
在紅木之間飄盪
的長笛樂聲

Chinese Translation (Simplified)

太阳下山了
在红木之间飘荡
的长笛乐声


Bio Sketch

Jane Reichhold was born as Janet Styer in 1937 in Lima , Ohio , USA . She had published over thirty books of haiku, renga, tanka, and translations. Her latest tanka book, Taking Tanka Home was translated into Japanese by Aya Yuhki. Her most popular book is Basho The Complete Haiku by Kodansha International. As founder and editor of AHA Books, Jane also published Mirrors: International Haiku Forum, Geppo, for the Yuki Teikei Haiku Society, and she had co-edited with Werner Reichhold, Lynx for Linking Poets since 1992. Lynx went online in 2000 in AHApoetry.com the web site Jane started in 1995. Since 2006 she had maintained an online forum – AHAforum